Primal Habits
It is currently Thu Mar 30, 2017 8:36 am


Feed

Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 3 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Apr 28, 2010 1:10 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 25, 2010 1:02 pm
Posts: 115



How to set a Wireless Router as an Access Point only.

If you already have a wireless Broadband router that you'd like to use only as an Access Point and a secondary switch with a separate router for sharing the Internet connection, the process is outlined below:

1. Change the IP of the wireless router to be in the same subnet as the main router without coinciding with the main router's base IP (you might have to plug in the wireless router into a PC to do that). Also disable the wireless router's DHCP server, so it wont conflict with the main router.
Example:
main router IP - 192.168.1.1 base IP, DHCP server range 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.200
wireless AP IP - 192.168.1.201 to 253 base IP, DHCP disabled.

2. Connect the Wireless router to the main one using LAN ports on both routers and a crossoer cable (or uplink port on one of the routers and a straight-through patch cable). Do not use the WAN port on the wireless router to connect to the LAN !

Notes:
Wireless routers can often only be used as an AP in Gateway mode (as opposed to repeater or bridge mode).
All LAN clients should get their internal IPs from one router only.
The WAN port on the wireless router should not be connected to anything.
You might want to turn off NAT on the wireless router.

_________________
Check Out RouterHead8080 T.V.



Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on MySpaceShare on DeliciousShare on Technorati
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat May 01, 2010 2:26 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat May 01, 2010 1:56 pm
Posts: 2
I recently set up a wireless router as the main internet router for a school campus network. It replaced a regular router that was not used anymore but I would've liked to retain the old router in its original capacity and just added the wireless router as an access point. Had I had time, I would've been able to research this and do it but the network had to be up and running immediately. My question to this post is: Routerhead8080, what you are basically saying is- give the wireless AP an IP address that is different from the DHCP Server's IP address? Or are you saying to give the wireless AP an address outside the DHCP Server's scope of 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.200, i.e., wireless AP IP address= 192.168.1.205 or 192.168.1.233....etc., but still with the subnet mask of 255.255.255.0? In other words, outside of the DHCP server's scope but still within the same subnet? Being schooled in Microsoft lingo, I use the term 'scope' to indicate a given 'range' of IP addresses assigned to a group of computers by the DHCP server and I want to make sure I am on the same page as you when you say 'range'.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat May 01, 2010 4:38 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 25, 2010 1:02 pm
Posts: 115
pavlovdog wrote:
I recently set up a wireless router as the main internet router for a school campus network. It replaced a regular router that was not used anymore but I would've liked to retain the old router in its original capacity and just added the wireless router as an access point. Had I had time, I would've been able to research this and do it but the network had to be up and running immediately. My question to this post is: Routerhead8080, what you are basically saying is- give the wireless AP an IP address that is different from the DHCP Server's IP address? Or are you saying to give the wireless AP an address outside the DHCP Server's scope of 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.200, i.e., wireless AP IP address= 192.168.1.205 or 192.168.1.233....etc., but still with the subnet mask of 255.255.255.0? In other words, outside of the DHCP server's scope but still within the same subnet? Being schooled in Microsoft lingo, I use the term 'scope' to indicate a given 'range' of IP addresses assigned to a group of computers by the DHCP server and I want to make sure I am on the same page as you when you say 'range'.


Hello pavlovdog,

Yes you will need to assign the *OLD* router an IP inside of the Scope of the main router......
For Example:
You should do something like this...

Main Router: 192.168.1.1
Old Router *Access Point* 191.168.1.1

Or something similar......

BUT....

Do not plug anything into the WAN on the old router.
Plug the receiving CAT wire to a LAN port so that the router is just a switch and the Wireless on the old router will be "the seperate access point".

In other words you will be simply turning the OLD Router LAN into a "switch" and the Wireless as a "router"

Remember Do Not connect to the WAN on the old router.

Also..... You need to disable the DHCP on the "OLD" router.

_________________
Check Out RouterHead8080 T.V.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 3 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]


Related topics
 Topics   Author   Replies   Views   Last post 
There are no new unread posts for this topic. the market Access to the fake flooring

francismake

0

24

Mon Mar 13, 2017 1:03 am

francismake View the latest post

 


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
cron

Affiliates    Terms of use    Privacy policy   

Primal Habits, a Sceptersoft Company
Copyright © 2010 - 2017 Sceptersoft LLC. All rights reserved.